Effect of Incorporation of Raw and Roasted Chickpea (Cicer Arietinum) on Growth and Feed Efficiency in Broiler Chicken
Airfare Daily Deals eCigarettes Eyeglasses Hotels Jewelry Online Backup Online Dating Online Printing Online Tickets Skin Care Textbook Rentals Vitamins Web Hosting Weddings
Find thousands of shopping-related forums
SEARCH

Effect of Incorporation of Raw and Roasted Chickpea (Cicer Arietinum) on Growth and Feed Efficiency in Broiler Chicken

The objectives of present study were to study the effect of incorporation of raw and roasted chickpea (Cicer arietinum) on growth, feed efficiency of broiler chicken. Intake of feed, dry matter, energy and crude protein increased but biological value decreased when the level of incorporation of chickpea was increased from 10 to 15%. Intake, metabolizability and retention of nutrients were high in winter season. Incorporation of raw chickpea in broiler feed decreased intake of feed and dry matter and retention of crude protein.

Effect of incorporation of raw and roasted chickpea (Cicer arietinum) on growth and feed efficiency in broiler chicken

 Sunita, Prakash Chandra, D.P. Tiwari* and Awadhesh Kishore**

 

RBS College, Bichpuri-283105, Agra INDIA

*GB PUAT, Pantnagar-263145 (U.K.) INDIA

**Sarvoday Mahavidyalaya, Chaumuhan-281406, Mathura INDIA

 

Summary:

 The objectives of present study were to study the effect of incorporation of raw and roasted chickpea (Cicer arietinum) on growth, feed efficiency of broiler chicken. Intake of feed, dry matter, energy and crude protein increased but biological value decreased when the level of incorporation of chickpea was increased from 10 to 15%. Intake, metabolizability and retention of nutrients were high in winter season. Incorporation of raw chickpea in broiler feed decreased intake of feed and dry matter and retention of crude protein.

 

Key words:

 Broiler, Chicken, Chickpea, Cicer arietinum, Feed efficiency, Growth, Roast

 

1.01 Objectives:

 

The objectives of present study were to study the effect of incorporation of raw and roasted chickpea (Cicer arietinum) on growth, feed efficiency of broiler chicken.

1.02 Experimental design:

 The work was designed to investigate the effectiveness of chickpea at different levels in various forms in two seasons. During the study, two experiments were conducted to find out the objectives of the research.

1.03 Experiment I:

 Feeding experiment with 4 treatments in which 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% chickpea was incorporated in the broiler diet with 3 replications. Two hundred and forty day old chicks were divided in to four groups of three replications in each with 20 broiler chicks in each replication. The feeding trial was done for 6 weeks (4 weeks starter and 2 week finisher).

1.04 Experiment II:

 Experiment II was conducted to find out comparative effect of feeding different form of chickpea on growth which includes 3 treatment groups i.e. R-1 (control), R-2 (raw chickpea) and R-3 (roasted chickpea). Each replicate consisted of 20 broilers chicks.

1.05 Seasons:

 Both the experiments were conducted in two seasons i.e. summer and winter in order to measure the variation on the performance of broilers due to season.

1.06 Management:

 The birds were housed in floor pen. They were housed on floor of a suitable size house and managed as any commercial broiler flock. Chicks were given the experimental diets and fresh, cool and clean drinking water ad libitum during the experimental periods. The housing and managerial conditions were similar in both the experiments in both the seasons for different treatment groups and their replications. All chicken groups were kept under the same management program and housing system, the house was illuminated continuously during the experimental period.

1.07 Ration:

 The experimental rations for starter and finisher broilers under study were formulated at the experimental site. Raw ingredients were bought from a local feed factory then mixed rations to fit the NRC requirements in control group. Chickpea, at the rate of 5%, 10% and 15% was incorporated in the broiler diet to formulate 3 test diets, respectively.

1.08 Observations:

The samples of feed were subjected for proximate analysis using standard technique. The chemical composition of all the feed was recorded in advance to formulate test diets.

1.09 Weight gain:

 Weekly live body weight of the individual chicks was recorded, during both the experiments in summer and winter. Chicks were weighed at weekly basis till the end of the experiment which lasted for 6 weeks (4 weeks starter and 2 week finisher). The average live body weight gain was calculated.

1.10 Feed intake:

 Feed intake was calculated by difference in feed offered and residue.

1.11 Feed efficiency ratio:

 

The feed efficiency ratio and feed conversion efficiency were recorded weekly. The feed efficiency was calculated in terms of gain per unit feed consumed by the birds. The amount of feed required for producing a unit of gain or average feed consumption per chick per week by average body gain per chick per week.

1.12 Metabolism trial:

 A metabolism trial of 3 days duration was conducted during the last three days of feeding trial after an adaptation period of another three days. During the metabolism trial a total collection of daily feed intake and excrete from 4 birds of each replicate was performed. Feed and excrete samples were kept oven dried in the plastic bottles till analyzed for chemical analysis.

1.13 Chemical composition:

 Feed and excreta samples were analyzed for dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), crude fiber (CF), crude fat or ether extract (EE), total ash, nitrogen free extract (NFE), total carbohydrates (TCHO), gross energy (GE) and organic matter (OM). The standard procedures were used for chemical analysis.

1.14 Statistical analysis:

 The data recorded during the experiment were analyzed using completely randomized block design. SPSS software was exercised for various statistical calculations. Critical difference was calculated.

2.00 Experimental findings:

 2.01 Daily feed intake:

Incorporation of chickpea upto 0, 5 and 10 per cent in broiler feed had no impact on feed intake but when the level was further increased upto 15 per cent, the daily feed intake reduced. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of raw feed in broiler feed decreased daily feed intake in comparison to that due to incorporation of control and roasted feed.

2.02 Dry matter intake:

 Incorporation of chickpea upto 0, 5 and 10 per cent in broiler feed had no impact on dry matter intake (DMI) but as the level was further increased upto 15 per cent, the DMI reduced. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of raw feed in broiler feed decreased DMI in comparison to that due to incorporation of control and roasted feed.

2.03 Energy intake:

 Incorporation of chickpea upto 0, 5 and 10 per cent in broiler feed had no impact on energy intake but as the level was further increased upto 15 per cent, energy intake reduced. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Energy intake remained unchanged due to incorporation of raw replicates.

2.04 Crude protein intake:

 Incorporation of chickpea upto 0, 5 and 10 per cent in broiler feed had no impact on crude protein intake but as the level was further increased upto 15 per cent, the crude protein intake reduced. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of raw replicates could not change this parameter.

2.05 Crude protein metabolizability:

 Incorporation of chickpea from 0 to 15 per cent in broiler feed had no effect on crude protein metabolizability. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of three replicates could not affect crude protein metabolizability in broilers.

2.06 Energy metabolizability:

 Incorporation of chickpea upto 0, 5 and 10 per cent in broiler feed had no impact on energy metabolizability but as the level was further increased upto 15 per cent, the energy metabolizability reduced. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of three replicates could not affect energy metabolizability in broilers.

2.07 Dry matter retention:

Incorporation of chickpea at 0 and 5 per cent and 10 and 15 per cent in broiler feed were differed with regard to dry matter retention. Increasing level of incorporation of chickpea declined the parameter in comparison to that in control. Dry matter retention was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of raw feed in broiler feed decreased dry matter retention in comparison to that due to incorporation of control and roasted feed.

2.08 Energy retention:

 Incorporation of chickpea from 0, 5 to 15 per cent in broiler feed had no impact on energy retention. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of raw replicates remained unaffected in this respect.

2.09 Crude protein retention:

 Incorporation of chickpea at 0 and 5 per cent in broiler feed had no impact on crude protein retention but when chickpea was incorporated at the rate of 15 per cent, it was declined in comparison to that in control. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of raw feed in broiler feed decreased crude protein retention in comparison to that due to incorporation of control and roasted feed.

2.10 Biological value:

 Incorporation of chickpea upto 0, 5 and 10 per cent in broiler feed had no impact on biological value but as the level was further increased upto 15 per cent, the biological value reduced. The parameter was high in winter season in comparison to that in summer. Incorporation of raw replicates remained unaffected in this respect.

Conclusion:

 Intake of feed, dry matter, energy and crude protein increased but biological value decreased when the level of incorporation of chickpea was increased from 10 to 15%. Intake, metabolizability and retention of nutrients were high in winter season. Incorporation of raw chickpea in broiler feed decreased intake of feed and dry matter and retention of crude protein.

Need an answer?
Get insightful answers from community-recommended
experts
in Birds on Knoji.
Would you recommend this author as an expert in Birds?
You have 0 recommendations remaining to grant today.
Comments (0)
ARTICLE DETAILS
RELATED ARTICLES
ARTICLE KEYWORDS